Honda’s new reverse-mounted engine on its way – and according to the patents, it’s coming in a very sporty package


 

Honda has filed plans for a rotary-type throttling device (!) for an upcoming sport bike that, in this first-registration sketch, looks amazing.

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What the bike in the drawings actually is remains something of a mystery. There’s no mention of a specific motorcycle model in the designs for the rotary throttling device, which improves inlet port performance by letting the right amount of air into motor as needed ahead of the cylinder with a moving valve that runs independently of the throttle. You can see the set-up for the rotary device that feeds the inlet ports directly, below.

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In the design directly above you can see the front of the motor to the left of the drawing and the ram air intake that feeds the air into a filter, behind is the motor where the fuel injection is clearly visible underneath the rotary throttling device – the circular part, number 43. The motor itself is mounted backwards in the frame, so the air runs directly into the engine and the exhaust exits out of the back.

What we can be sure of is that this bike is NOT the much-hyped V4 (look at the single-view cylinder head) compare this latest patent to the complete V4 patent we brought you over two years ago and have again posted below. You can see one of our original exclusive postings on the V4 HERE.

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We can also be sure that this is NOT the in-the-pipeline CBR600 replacement (look at the various points highlighted in the patent below for the CBR600 which we ran over a year ago – below). Fancy checking out our original exclusive postings on the CBR600? Click HERE for that.

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But exactly what this bike IS is something of a mystery at the moment. What we can see is that the engine is sited in such a way that the exhaust comes from the rear of the cylinder which, like the system currently used on the BMW G310R.

What is also clear in the drawings is the mystery bike’s race-oriented fairing and seat unit.

These drawings are highly unlikely to be the finished view of how this motorcycle will end up looking – there’s no such detail as indicators, number plate hanger etc included – but the outline shape of the bike, combined with the meaty swingarm, does point to something sporty on its way.

 

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