Chain

Understand the driving force behind your bike with MCM’s handy hints and know-how…

When should I replace my chain?
A worn-out chain will sap power and potentially become dangerous. Since the drive chain is responsible for getting all the horsepower from the engine to the wheel, riders who want to transfer that to the ground properly need to have a decent chain.

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You need to choose a chain depending on your bike’s power output and its weight–a chain needs to transmit the right amount of power to move a bike and a heavier machine puts more strain on the chain. Most sport bikes and big touring bikes now run a 530-pitch chain as standard for road use. Signs that a chain needs replacing are an increase in vibration and/ or noise levels, plus excessive chain elongation. If your chain is too tight to start with, it will speed up wear through excess pressure on the sprocket teeth, chain joints and shaft bearings.

Slack chains can top sprocket teeth and also have a whip-like action that can lead to snapping.

Common causes of premature chain wear are a misaligned rear wheel and worn sprockets. Misalignment is indicated bywear on the side of sprocket teeth. Chains could develop tight joints because the sprocket teeth are forcing the inside plates outward on the bushings, and then binding the joint.

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