360° pitch mount allows positioning anywhere, and leaves only a small bracket when removed.

360° pitch mount allows positioning anywhere, and leaves only a small bracket when removed.

Tested by: John Milbank, Editor of Motorcycle Sport & Leisure magazine | £299.99 | www.tomtom.com

I remember my Dad making me a large aluminium plate that went across the tank of my CBR600 when I was younger, to carry our family’s massive VHS-C camcorder. When I hit ripples in the road, the footage would shake as the tape left the recording head, and editing was a nightmare of cables to the video recorder.

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Then GoPro changed everything. The reference for action cameras, a whole host of others followed; now TomTom has entered the fight, and like its Rider sat-nav, it’s designed to be as user-friendly as possible.

GoPros have moved on a little since the Hero 3 I’m using as a comparison, but the interface hasn’t changed much, and the mounting system is unaltered. While there might be slight advances in picture quality, for users like you and me, the high-end cameras all offer incredible HD video; what sets units apart is their ease of use.

GoPros aren’t the most intuitive, with their small, basic display, and no idea of what the camera can see. Some Drift cameras have a full colour screen that acts as a viewfinder, and makes setting options much easier. The TomTom doesn’t have a digital viewfinder, but its menu structure is the most simple and intuitive I’ve used. The GoPro and TomTom can both be linked to smartphones or tablets, and while later versions should be a lot better, My Hero 3 is horribly laggy, the app displaying footage a few seconds behind the camera; not so with the TomTom, which is almost instant.

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