Dunlopo-Logo

duncan-with-bike

Personal fitness trainer, 56-year-old Duncan Evans reveals his home-built custom…

I served my apprenticeship as a mechanical engineer, then worked my way through a number of industries finishing in aerospace, before being a trainer for the past ten years.

Article continues below...
Advert
Article continues below...
Advert

I started riding at 14 and got an FS1E at 16, before a new RD 200 DX at 17. I’ve since had an Aprilia RSV Mille 1000 R, Buell 1125 R, Kawasaki KE175, Ducati Pantah 500, a bobber with a Harley Sportster engine, a number of bikes used for European tours, a Kawasaki Vulcan 800 Drifter, a Honda VFR800 VTEC and a BMW R1200GS Adventure.

Like Paul Greenhalgh, I was struggling to find a bike that was perfect for me. I loved my GS – on the move it was effortless, but the final straw came on my annual visit to the TT – getting on and off the boat with luggage highlighted just how much of a challenge it was.

I replaced her with a BMW R1200R Classic, but found myself pining for the Adventure’s styling, so started looking into the history of the GS range. The early models seemed to have been designed with the focus on simplicity and agility – the engine sizes, whilst smaller, provided plenty of poke and the ground clearance allowed you to take the bike over any terrain. I loved the simplicity and wanted to build the type of GS that I could use on a daily basis. My bike would have to be functional yet finished to a high standard, built on a limited budget (because that’s all I have) and should not involve any frame cutting or welding.

Article continues below...
Advert