This is the motorcycle that Yamaha is using to show how the carbon-fibre resin chassis that auto detects damage and bruises will be used. The factory has put the tech onto a patent around a FJR sport tourer - does that mean that this is a pointer to a lightweight, high-tech version of the popular mile muncher?
This is the motorcycle that Yamaha is using to show how the carbon-fibre resin chassis that auto detects damage and BRUISES will be used. The factory has put the tech onto a patent around a FJR sport tourer – does that mean that this is a pointer to a lightweight, high-tech version of the popular mile muncher?

Here’s a design patent from Yamaha that’s going to blow a few minds – a carbon-fibre framed motorcycle that BRUISES when the frame is damaged, even if the bike falls over at a standstill.

It might sound like a thought-pattern straight from the latest sci-fi blockbuster movie, but the truth of the matter is that this plan to shift road-going chassis into the next phase of everyday motorcycle reality IS happening in the Yamaha laboratories right now.

The dotted line within the carbon-fibre resin frame is the detection wire that, if damaged at any of the key points built into the frame, tells the rider that the chassis is damaged.
The dotted line within the carbon-fibre resin frame is the detection wire that, if damaged at any of the key points built into the frame, tells the rider that the chassis is compromised.

The patent was filed just weeks ago under the title ‘Leaning Vehicle’ making it suitably vague to find in the United States patent office, but now it’s been unearthed by MoreBikes you can see that the details of what this design actually contains are pretty jaw-dropping.

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The dotted line included within a on-piece carbon-fibre resin seat unit detects left-side damage to itself between points 645 and 646. Once it finds damage, it sends notification to an output unit.
The dotted line included within a on-piece carbon-fibre resin seat unit detects left-side damage to itself between points 645 and 646. Once it finds damage, it sends notification to an output unit.

In the extensive 29 page document, Yamaha outlines its plans for a motorcycle (using the current FJR bike in the illustration – could this mean that the bike where this tech is first seen will be a large capacity, fast sport tourer?) that has a carbon-fibre resin main frame with a carbon-fibre resin subframe bolted to it.