Lexmoto Isca 125

Words: Simon Meyer

Pushing the boundaries of what a 125cc commuter is capable of; we’ve been riding the Lexmoto Isca 125 hard – taking on twisties, town traffic and a treacherous commute. Here’s how we got on.

Early one morning I got a message to tell me that the Lexmoto Isca 125 was here – and as it was wheeled off the van I got my first impression of the little, lightweight commuter. Walking around the bike for the first time and giving it a quick onceover, I immediately noticed its low seat height, large fuel tank and sharp front end. Alright, so it’s an Asian import and it sits towards the more budget end of the market – but the build quality looked pretty decent too. So far so good.

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Jumping onto the Lexmoto Isca for the first time, I swung my leg over and kicked the bike’s rear end. I’d misjudged just how steep an angle the back end has. Oops. I didn’t do it again though. Settling into the seat, I found the riding position upright but neutral – with the handlebars, switchgears and footpegs all easy to reach.

My ride home is roughly 22 miles across hills, open roads and tight flowing turns. It’s a lovely ride – even in the depths of winter on a little 125. Using the Lexmoto Isca for my daily commute seemed like the perfect test for the plucky little commuter. I’d get to see how it performed in town before really pushing its limits out on the open roads.

Lexmoto Isca

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Lexmoto Isca 125: On the road

Leaving HQ and picking my way out of town, the first thing I noticed was just how light and agile the bike is; tight turns and filtering were effortless. It’s a doddle to ride.

As I left the Isca’s natural habitat in town and got onto the open road, things got a little more challenging. I quickly realised that I was going to need to work the engine really hard to make solid progress and not hold up the traffic. Keep the throttle wide open and hold your speed through corners and you’ll be fine – but if you let the rpm’s drop down to far, and you’ll be slamming your way down the gearbox to start building speed once again. It might sound like hard work, but even for a seasoned biker like me, it was a surprisingly rewarding experience.

I was told that the Isca’s capable of getting up to a top speed of 60mph, and yes, I did see it on the speedo a few times – but I’m not a small chap, so generally I found myself barrelling along at around 55mph with the throttle pinned. Not bad as far as I’m concerned. Of course, steep hills forced the bike to work even harder, dropping my speed down to about 45mph – but coming down the other side, I managed to hit the eye watering speed of 68mph.

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