Dave Manning tells us what it’s like to spend time on the big ‘Busa…

Having the Hayabusa as a long-termer means that not only will I be able to get used to what button changes what attributes, but also I’ll actually be able to play around with the rider configured modes to – potentially at least – get the Suzuki Drive Mode Selector Alpha systems set up to suit my type of riding. These amount to the bike’s power delivery (Power Mode Selector), traction control (Motion Track Traction Control System), and anti-wheelie (Anti-lift Control System), although there are other things to play with once I get that lot all dialled in.

Dave Manning and the Suzuki Hayabusa

Dave Manning and the Suzuki Hayabusa

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As it is right now, all I’ve managed to do is work out how the cruise control works, which sounds a little tardy of me, but bear in mind that, at the time of writing this review, I have only had the bike long enough to get through one tank of fuel. I’d swapped the pillion seat cover (which is an optional extra, at £180 for the actual seat), so I could take my good lady wife out for a spin, although I didn’t get around to fitting the grab rail, as that’s a slightly more involved procedure, whereas the cover/ seat swap is done in seconds, and two-up shows that the ultra-smooth quickshifter is of great benefit for the pillion.

One of the things that I was as keen to double check as soon as possible was the power figure that Suzuki claimed for the Gen 3 Hayabusa, of which so many internet experts had seemingly been very smug over, given that the official factory power figures were lower than those for the previous model. So, in order to see just how pokey the new bike was, I headed south and west to see Sean Mills at Big CC Racing (